Indie News

                Nicolas Winding Refn Brings Gun-Toting Rapists and an All-Night Car Chase to Cannes With Amazon Series

                Nicolas Winding Refn Brings Gun-Toting Rapists and an All-Night Car Chase to Cannes With Amazon Series
                Filmmakers often head to television in search of a broader canvas to tell their stories. It’s usually less attractive to those who relish texture over plot, as well as cinematic experimentation. In recent years, Nicolas Winding Refn has veered closer to that category, constructing a moody body of work around expressionistic showdowns that build to bloodiness with grim finality. But as television continues to provide more room for innovation, Refn’s 10-part hitman saga “Too Old to Die Young,” a 13-hour Amazon mini-series premiering on Amazon this summer, arrives right on schedule.

                As if to assure fans he hasn’t abandoned his filmmaking bonafides, Refn premiered two episodes of the show at the Cannes Film Festival, where he first solidified his grimy auteur status with “Drive.” Since the festival only screened episodes 3 and 4 from the show, it’s hard to assess the full picture of this sprawling effort, since each installment runs feature length.
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                ‘First Love’ Review: Takashi Miike Delivers a Violently Hilarious Yakuza Romp

                ‘First Love’ Review: Takashi Miike Delivers a Violently Hilarious Yakuza Romp
                A boxer with a brain tumor, a crooked cop with terrible luck, a screw-up yakuza who’s seen too many movies, a dismembered Chinese gangster who wields a pump-action shotgun with his one remaining arm, a terrified prostitute who’s stalked by a ghost in tighty whities, an unkillable femme fatale who will kick a man to death just for being in her way, and the world’s most wonderful heroin. Those are just some of the many different ingredients that prolific Japanese auteur Takashi Miike swirls into his frequently sublime new gangster film, a piece of work so feral and full of life that you’d never guess it was (at least) the 90th feature its director has made in the last 30 years. Even now, after making everything from scarring horror masterpieces (“Audition”) to unwatchable family comedies (“Ninja Kids!!!”), Miike hasn’t lost any of his lust for life,
                See full article at Indiewire »

                Do, and Teach: The Workshop Films of Raúl Ruiz

                Anyone who has done more than a little research into the career of Raúl Ruiz (1941-2011) knows that his filmography is full of holes—and mysteries. No matter which version of that list you consult, there are works, short or long, that precious few people have seen; as well as some whose very existence is difficult to verify. Visions and Marvels of the Christian Religion? Responso? Mirror of Tunisia? Agathopedia? Some of these I have actually seen; others I am still chasing. I recall the advice given to me by British film historian Ian Christie, while Ruiz was still in our world: “You need to hang out with him for a while, until he mentions some secret project you’ve never heard about before …”Ruiz made films in every possible situation, and with every kind of technology. Some he shot at home with friends, on video or Super-8. Others—the ones we know best,
                See full article at MUBI »

                Jeff Daniels On Updating Atticus Finch: ‘I Hit the Delete Button’ on Gregory Peck

                • Indiewire
                Jeff Daniels On Updating Atticus Finch: ‘I Hit the Delete Button’ on Gregory Peck
                Jeff Daniels is in it for the art, not the awards. That’s why he’s co-hosting two films on Turner Classic Movies this Sunday May 19 with Ben Mankiewicz: “To Kill a Mockingbird” (1962) and “The Trip to Bountiful” (1985) — both are films written by legendary scribe Horton Foote.

                “Why did I want to pay tribute to Horton Foote?” Daniels said. “He’s a great writer. End of story.”

                Daniels has earned a Tony nomination for Best Actor in a play in the role of Atticus Finch in Aaron Sorkin’s adaptation of Harper Lee’s classic novel, currently running on Broadway. That Daniels wants to talk about Horton Foote and his screenplay for the 1962 “Mockingbird” film is striking, considering how much Sorkin’s take on the material departs from both the novel and the film. This Atticus Finch has feet of clay — or is at least a tad less godlike than Gregory Peck’s portrayal,
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                Pedro Almodóvar’s ‘Pain and Glory’ Is A Beautiful Celebration Of Filmmaking & Love [Cannes Review]

                The credits unspool, “Un film de Almodóvar” appears on-screen. For audiences, this card is a guarantee of quality—a promise backed up by a fistful of masterpieces: “Woman on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown,” “All About My Mother,” “Talk to Her,” “Volver,” “The Skin I Live In,” among others. Pedro Almodóvar’s latest work “Pain and Glory” arrives at the Cannes Film Festival following its April premiere in Spain, and he’s delivered yet another masterwork.

                Continue reading Pedro Almodóvar’s ‘Pain and Glory’ Is A Beautiful Celebration Of Filmmaking & Love [Cannes Review] at The Playlist.
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                ‘Fleabag’ Season 2: Phoebe Waller-Bridge Goes Out With A Masterfully Hilarious & Heartbreaking Bang [Review]

                Faith, in anyone, or anything, never really factored into “Fleabag,” neither the eponymous self-destructive character nor the tremendous BBC Three/Amazon show written by its star and creator Phoebe Waller-Bridge, about a damaged, trainwreck 20-something woman living in London wracked with guilt and grief, but emotionally unequipped to do anything about it. Something of an excruciating, self-immolating condemnation and minor celebration of our 20-something era—when our monstrously narcissistic and self-absorbed years of irresponsible boozing, prodigious sex, and cigarettes mowed down anyone in our path, but also yielded a few entertaining stories—”Fleabag” was always a wickedly clever, razor-sharp, inventive, and even brutalizing portrait of adultolescence; the lost, often rock-bottom years, most people generally go through as they stumble towards true adulthood and finding themselves in this mad, mad world.

                Continue reading ‘Fleabag’ Season 2: Phoebe Waller-Bridge Goes Out With A Masterfully Hilarious & Heartbreaking Bang [Review] at The Playlist.
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                ‘A Night at Switch n’ Play’ Trailer: Drag Kings, Burlesque, and Glitter — Oh My!

                Thanks to “RuPaul’s Drag Race,” more audiences have fallen in love with the art of drag than ever before. But for all the many seasons of the VH1 reality show, “Drag Race” has never once done a Drag King challenge, much less had a contestant who satirizes masculinity instead of femininity. At a neighborhood queer bar in Brooklyn, the experimental drag and burlesque show “Switch n’ Play” has played host to inventive drag kings, experimental burlesque dancers, and more traditional drag queen acts as well. The queer performance collective is on full display in a new documentary, which will have its world premiere at Inside Out Toronto, Canada’s leading Lgbtq film festival.

                Here’s the official film description: “There’s something very queer happening at a bar in Brooklyn, and in the new film ‘A Night at Switch n’ Play’ you are invited to come and watch.

                Switch
                See full article at Indiewire »

                TV Plays the Procrastination Game As End of Emmy Eligibility Looms

                The last few weeks of the TV season always have been a mad crush of season finales, major events, and streaming show drops, and that’s especially true this year. Beleaguered TV fans, snowed under by promising new shows and big episodes, might not dig their way out until September.

                But as television finds itself transitioning into a year-round proposition, where new seasons can drop at any time, in any place, then why is there still such a mad crush of content jamming itself into the final two weeks of May?

                Blame the Emmys.

                May 31 marks the final day of the 2018-2019 Emmys eligibility window, which means that content providers are scrambling to make their last-ditch bids for awards glory, not unlike a procrastinating student pulling an all-nighter in the hours before a term paper is due.

                It’s all just the latest iteration of an ever-growing TV arms race:
                See full article at Indiewire »

                ‘Game of Thrones’: Relax, the Finale Is Going to Be Just Fine

                ‘Game of Thrones’: Relax, the Finale Is Going to Be Just Fine
                [Editor’s note: The following contains spoilers for “Game of Thrones” Season 8, Episode 5, “The Bells.”]

                Following Daenerys’ (Emilia Clarke) epic heel turn in the penultimate episode of “Game of Thrones,” fans who feel betrayed by showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss have alternately called for a redo of the season or to just burn it all down like so much of the Red Keep. Ending the series was never going to be an easy task — even if the duo had author George R.R. Martin’s rough master plan at their fingertips — but this season’s missteps have corroded fans’ faith seemingly for good. Fear not. The problems that have been present throughout the season are actually why the finale will stick the (King’s) landing.

                The season began with a promise from the showrunners to be more respectful of time and pacing, but they overcorrected with the first two episodes’ static plotting. However, they included several lovely character moments,
                See full article at Indiewire »

                ‘And We Go Green’ Trailer: Leonardo DiCaprio’s Doc Is Coming To Cannes & Sheds Light On Electric Car Racing

                In addition to being one of the biggest names in Hollywood, actor Leonardo DiCaprio is also one of the foremost authorities (at least in public perception) on the issues affecting our environment. So, when he’s not on screen dazzling audiences, like in the upcoming “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,” he’s likely traveling around the world promoting conservation and being his environmentalist self.

                And at this year’s Cannes, it was just announced that DiCaprio is bringing a brand-new documentary to the festival for a special screening, titled “And We Go Green.” But this isn’t the same type of doc that the actor produced in 2016, titled “Before the Flood.” No, the new doc takes a look at the climate change issue by focusing on electric race cars that are part of Formula E.

                Continue reading ‘And We Go Green’ Trailer: Leonardo DiCaprio’s Doc Is Coming To
                See full article at The Playlist »

                ‘Black Monday’: For Don Cheadle, Unpredictability Is Key to Career Longevity

                ‘Black Monday’: For Don Cheadle, Unpredictability Is Key to Career Longevity
                Don Cheadle most recently suited up as War Machine in “Avengers: Endgame,” and as the the self-made, self-destructive Maurice “Mo” Monroe in Showtime’s “Black Monday,” but the greatest metric of his success can be summed up in one word: No.

                “I’m very fortunate right now,” Cheadle said. “I did the hustle for 33, 34 years, and now it’s a deluge. I’m in a position to turn stuff down, so that’s good.”

                For the better part of the last decade, Cheadle has said yes to television, specifically Showtime, starting with “House of Lies,” which ran for five seasons and earned him four Emmy nominations, and one Golden Globe win in the Best Supporting Actor – Series category. He returned to the premium cabler this year for the delightfully ugly depiction of 1980s Wall Street as Mo, the unscrupulous founder of a renegade Wall Street firm in the year leading up to Black Monday,
                See full article at Indiewire »

                Michael Fassbender, Jamie Foxx, & Peter Dinklage In Talks For Mel Gibson’s ‘The Wild Bunch’ Remake

                Love him or hate him (and many of you are proud to be in either camp), Mel Gibson is still a massive figure in Hollywood. In addition to the various major roles he seems to find himself signing on for almost daily, Gibson is also an Oscar-winning director. In fact, even though his name brings insane debate on social media, the filmmaker’s last directorial effort, “Hacksaw Ridge,” won 2 Oscars and was nominated for 4 more just three years ago.

                Continue reading Michael Fassbender, Jamie Foxx, & Peter Dinklage In Talks For Mel Gibson’s ‘The Wild Bunch’ Remake at The Playlist.
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                ‘Pain and Glory’ Review: Pedro Almodóvar’s Best Movie in Years Is His Most Personal — Cannes

                ‘Pain and Glory’ Review: Pedro Almodóvar’s Best Movie in Years Is His Most Personal — Cannes
                Across 30-plus years of filmmaking, Pedro Almodóvar has accrued the auteurist equivalence of a god, and his distinctive romantic whimsy carries such weight that the tagline “a film by Almodóvar” conveys more brand than vision. “Pain and Glory,” the filmmaker’s best and most personal movie in years, brings him back to mortal terrain. A grounded melancholic rumination on aging and artistic intent steeped in the aging director’s own experiences, it may be the closest Almodóvar comes to crafting a memoir in the medium he knows best.

                At least, it looks that way on the surface. “Pain and Glory” stars an exceptionally world-weary Antonio Banderas, his face caked in salt-and-pepper stubble and framed by an unruly mop of hair, as an acclaimed director wrestling with his past and present. The actor looks so much like his long-time collaborator that “Pain and Glory” may well be deemed “a film about Almodóvar.
                See full article at Indiewire »

                ‘Little Joe’ Review: A Horror Film that Dangerously Compares Antidepressants to an Alien Invasion — Cannes

                ‘Little Joe’ Review: A Horror Film that Dangerously Compares Antidepressants to an Alien Invasion  — Cannes
                In lesser hands, “Little Joe” would be a very dangerous film. As it stands, the latest masterful psychodrama from Austrian powerhouse Jessica Hausner still has plenty of potential to offend. A horticultural riff on “Invasion of the Body Snatchers” that broadly likens the spread of antidepressants to a dehumanizing alien force, “Little Joe” can be seen as a direct attack on anyone who’s ever appreciated the benefits of a mood-enhancing pharmaceutical, either firsthand or otherwise; the movie isn’t the least bit subtle in its suggestion that people on Prozac are addicted to their own well-being, and that their dependency siphons away at the full spectrum of who they are.

                At the same time, Hausner — whatever her personal feelings on the matter — is too cunning an artist to launch such an uncomplicated broadside against millions of human beings who are just trying their best to put one foot in front of the other.
                See full article at Indiewire »

                ‘Diego Maradona’ Trailer: Oscar-Winning Director Of ‘Amy’ Puts A Spotlight On Maradona In New Cannes Doc

                If you’re a fan of sports, then certain names will never be forgotten. Diego Maradona is one of those names. The Argentine soccer/football athlete is widely regarded as one of (if not the) best men to ever play the game. And now, Maradona finds himself the subject of a Cannes-bound documentary.

                Read More: 2019 Cannes Film Festival: The 21 Most Anticipated Movies

                As seen in the first trailer for the documentary, simply titled “Diego Maradona,” the film isn’t just interested in the athlete’s activities on the pitch.

                Continue reading ‘Diego Maradona’ Trailer: Oscar-Winning Director Of ‘Amy’ Puts A Spotlight On Maradona In New Cannes Doc at The Playlist.
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                Abbas Kiarostami’s ‘Koker Trilogy’ & Jane Campion’s ‘An Angel At My Table’ Highlight Criterion’s August Releases

                It’s that time again, film fans. Another month goes by and we’re back telling you what’s coming in August from the Criterion Collection. And like every month, our wallets weep. August sees the release of the critically-acclaimed “Koker Trilogy” from Palme d’Or-winning filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami. His three films are joined by great movies from Jane Campion, Yasujiro Ozu, Lucille Carra, and Douglas Sirk.

                Continue reading Abbas Kiarostami’s ‘Koker Trilogy’ & Jane Campion’s ‘An Angel At My Table’ Highlight Criterion’s August Releases at The Playlist.
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                ‘True Detective’: Creating the Three Faces of Mahershala Ali’s Troubled Wayne Hays

                ‘True Detective’: Creating the Three Faces of Mahershala Ali’s Troubled Wayne Hays
                It’s about time that two-time supporting actor Oscar winner Mahershala Ali (“Green Book” and “Moonlight”) got a lead role, and his troubled Arkansas cop, Wayne Hays, was a game-changer for Season 3’s “True Detective” on HBO.

                The fact that Ali got to play Hays at three different stages of his life: his thirties, forties, and seventies, made it a more remarkable achievement as we got to witness the personal impact of the macabre murder mystery. The three faces of Hays became a study in hope, futility, and dementia as he is consumed by the case. And the masterful makeup and hair work aided in Ali’s powerful performance.

                Beginning with his grandfather as a point of reference, Ali collaborated with makeup artists Debi Young and Mike Marino and hairstylist Lawrence Davis to create a unified look that suited him best. “He asked me to come do this project with
                See full article at Indiewire »

                ‘Booksmart’: Hype Yourself Up By Watching The First 6 Minutes Of One Of The Best Comedies Of The Year

                Comedy, like most film genres, occasionally needs a kick in the pants. Historically, there have been films that have changed the landscape of the genre, hurtling it in new directions. Films like “Animal House,” “Airplane!,” “Caddyshack,” “Old School,” and more recently, “Superbad” have all given the comedy genre a much-needed shot in the arm, twisting the genre in new ways and expanding the scope in the process.

                Continue reading ‘Booksmart’: Hype Yourself Up By Watching The First 6 Minutes Of One Of The Best Comedies Of The Year at The Playlist.
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                ‘His Dark Materials’ Trailer: HBO/BBC Fantasy Series Stars Dafne Keen, James McAvoy, Lin-Manuel Miranda & More

                ‘His Dark Materials’ Trailer: HBO/BBC Fantasy Series Stars Dafne Keen, James McAvoy, Lin-Manuel Miranda & More
                If you’re a fan of Philip Pullman’s famous novel series “His Dark Materials,” you’re probably familiar with the ill-fated attempt to adapt the series for live-action in 2007’s “The Golden Compass.” Produced at the height of ‘Harry Potter’ and ‘Narnia’ buzz in the film industry, “The Golden Compass” failed to turn into a franchise and was ultimately disappointing for fans of the novels.

                Continue reading ‘His Dark Materials’ Trailer: HBO/BBC Fantasy Series Stars Dafne Keen, James McAvoy, Lin-Manuel Miranda & More at The Playlist.
                See full article at The Playlist »

                ‘Bond 25’ Has Age Issues, Only One of Which Is Daniel Craig

                ‘Bond 25’ Has Age Issues, Only One of Which Is Daniel Craig
                Daniel Craig ran on a dock, hurt his ankle, and hobbled “Bond 25” for a week. Shooting on location in Jamaica, Eon Prods. is likely well protected from any short-term ill effects: That’s what production insurance is for. However, for both the 51-year-old actor who portrays James Bond and the 57-year-old franchise he services, age is now a factor.

                Here are some concerns for the Bond 25 team:

                This One Needs to Be a Rebound

                Released in 2015, “Spectre” grossed around $900 million worldwide; its 2012 predecessor “Skyfall” made an adjusted $1.2 billion. “Spectre” still turned a profit, but that’s a 25% downward trend that needs to be reversed. Domestically, “Skyfall” was the third biggest domestic hit, behind only “Thunderball” and “Goldfinger.” However, “Spectre” did over 77% of its business overseas. Even in these days of growing foreign impact, this was particularly high — and in North America, it had the lowest gross of Craig’s Bond titles.
                See full article at Indiewire »
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